PhD Projects for Future Students

Disproportionate health burden on world's poorest from climate extremes

The world’s lowest income countries experience greater increases in temperature extremes compared to the highest income countries. This disproportionate impact occurs because their typically tropical location predisposes them to lower temperature variability and thus greater changes in temperature extremes from climate change. The increase in projected climate extremes has the potential to drive the emergence and redistribution of infectious diseases. This interdisciplinary project will develop and integrate climate and epidemiological models to explore the impact of climate extremes on the infectious disease burden of lower and higher income countries. 

Closing date: ongoing                            

Inquiries  donna.green@unsw.edu.au

Our health during heatwaves: Is climate change responsible?

Heatwaves have adverse health impacts on Australians. Recent heatwaves have incurred severe health burdens, which are likely to worsen under a warmer climate. This project will examine the influence of anthropogenic climate change on health impacts of Australians during heatwaves. It will involve investigating high-impact events and determining vulnerable demographics and exacerbated diseases. Analyses of climate (e.g., observations and projections from climate models) and human health (e.g., hospital admissions) data will be undertaken for various regional and temporal scales. Once health impacts of significant heatwaves are isolated, cutting-edge detection and attribution methods will determine the role of anthropogenic climate change.

Closing date: ongoing                            

Inquiries sarah.kirkpatrick@unsw.edu.au

Droughts, flooding rains and human security in a changing climate                                                 

Droughts and floods contribute to food insecurity and famine, the spread of waterborne disease, and the loss of property and livelihood. Climate change will likely amplify drought-flood cycles, resulting in longer dry seasons, increasingly intense floods, and an overall unpredictability in rainfall patterns. In regions, like the Sahel, already affected by periodic drought and flooding this will have serious - and immediate - impacts on millions of people. This interdisciplinary project will use state-of-the-art climate observations and models within a human security framework to evaluate the impact of drought-flood cycles on the health, economy and environmental security of affected populations.

Closing date: ongoing                            

Inquiries  l.alexander@unsw.edu.au 


Positions for new PhD students are advertised on a regular basis. If you see one advertised on our Twitter feed, @AUclimatehealth, or if you have a research project that you think we'd be interested in, please contact us!